There can be many reasons why cats stop using their litter boxes. Here are the simple, obvious ones. There are fixes, too.

Infections and disease

Apart from simple urinary tract infections, cats can also suffer from issues that interfere with their peeing. Urinary blockages can kill a cat in days. The problem is that cats are very brave, so by the time they show pain, a simple issue may already have escalated. If your pet shows any kind of litter box trouble, be safe, and take your pet to the vet immediately.

A dirty box

Cats are very clean animals that will not pee in a dirty litter box. So scoop meticulously – twice a day, minimum – and replace the litter often.

Ambience matters

It’s not good to put the litter box in an area that smells bad, like near an open dustbin or by a smelly pipe. If you think a place has an unpleasant odour, your pet will think so, too. This is why cat litter trays with covers that trap the smell can be a problem, too.

Sharing is not caring

A few pets are very relaxed about sharing food bowls, beds, scratching poles and litter boxes. Others want to have their own. This is because cats can be very territorial. So if you have more than one pet, it makes sense to give each one his or her own litter box.

Emotional upheaval

A visitor, a new baby, a new pet, new neighbours, or even construction in the condo unit upstairs can drive a sensitive cat into despair. Don’t punish. Be gentle with your pet, and figure out how to help them.